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will discuss a national school choice week and the education options available to students across the country. first, we want about what's coming up on c-span2 and c- span3. 3's an2's booktv and c-span american history take -- american history tv ticket to santa fe, new mexico. that is coming up at noon -- a visit to local literary landmarks, interviews with authors from the area. here is a clip from santa fe writer james morris as he talks about joseph pulitzer and his book. >> i am james mcgrath morris. behind me stand some early printing presses. this seemed like a perfect place to talk about the man who revolutionized american newspapers. what i for started working on the book, people would react with recognition when i was writing about joseph pulitzer. it was clear from their expressions of anger about the name and not anything about his life. he shares his fate with alfred nobel, which is being well known for prize, but not well known for what he did in his life. alfred nobel was an explosive munitions maker. few people understand the significant role joseph pulitzer played in american
effects on economy and education if budget cuts go into effect on march. the sequester, among those testifying, shirley ann jackson, and joins me now.the sequester, testifying, shirley ann jackson, and joins me now.into effect on. the sequester, among those testifying, shirley ann jackson, and joins me now. welcome. you're no stranker to washington. born and raised here and former head of the nuclear regulatory commission. what are your big concerns about science and technology and the effects of the sequester if it goes in to effect? >> the big concerns are these. science and technology and the basic research that under girds it have been the the basis of over 50% of our gdp growth for 50 years. but the things we take for granted today are based on research that occurred over a 10, 20, 30 year period, even 50 years. and so one has to understand the source of idea generation. secondly, one has to have human talent. and that stall letalent is supp fellowships that come out of federal support. if the sequester occurs and occurs in a blunt way that can with devastating effects on resea
trained people in the war zone and educational where, that you lack the capability to have well-trained individuals that you can deploy elsewhere. and that creates a real readiness crisis for us. >> thank you, mr. chairman. thank you. >> thank you very much, senator. senator bloomen that is next. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i want to join my colleagues in thanking you, secretary panetta for your extraordinary service to our nation, and the personal sober and time that you are have devoted to all of us on the panel and other members of the congress. general dempsey, thank you as well for your service. and to both of you for your forthright and credible and significant testimony today explaining some answers to questions that are painful, i think, for all of us, and i know for you having attended the services and ceremonies in honor of these brave patriots and heroes, as you call them, and also your knowledge personally of them. and i'm struck as senator senator kaine was by the provocative i would prefer to call it powerful statement you offered regarding the effect on the nati
of the healthcare spending. that is an important point. >> let's switch to another passionate topic. education. quite a few questions from the audience on how much can we afford to fund and where should we be funding and investing in the educational system? should it be done on a national level or a state level? >> let's mix it up, you go first. >> i have read that test scores of american elementary and secondary educational students have not increased and the famous nation at risk report in the early 1980's. even though spending has increased dramatically. i question whether the solution to the problem is, let's take those systems and pour money into it are. it's hard to argue against earning more money, that and possibly hurt. but you basically have major structural flaws in the way the system is organized. it is not producing the results that we need. i strongly believe that -- i would say, after entitlement spending, i would put the quality of our educational outcomes as the greatest long-term threat to america's economic strength. it is the most important thing, and it has to do with stru
mailers in march, next month, and will be conducting a number of educational efforts to make sure we reach all business customers. as we get closer to the delivery scheduled change in in august, we will be publishing information in post offices, putting it online and other customer contact to make sure our residential customers know. let me conclude with a couple of thoughts. this announcement today is just one part of a much larger strategy to return the postal service to long-term financial stability. the plans saves $2 billion annually, that we have a $20 billion gap to close. we are striving to raise revenues, reduce costs and gain efficiencies throughout the entire organization and making this change to our delivery schedule is a big-ticket item and simply too big of a cost savings to ignore. in fact, i would strongly argue it would be irresponsible for the postal service not to pursue this course. second, we are implementing this approach to improve our overall business performance. there is a strong and growing demand for our package service and we need to meet that over the coming
to me. she was great. she is articulate, very well educated, did some wonderful things, knew how to handle the power of male egos. but the press would not give her the same accolades, the general media would not give for this and accolades, not because she was competent, but because of her political ideology. there is some dispute bi -- skewed bias rating hillary clinton for some of the wrong things. host: on twitter -- "the washington post" adds this as far as analysis of her time in office -- "many of clinton's successes appeared to be due largely to her personal popularity and famous work ethics, attributes that were on display in her final days in office." nevada. caller: i would like to make a few comments about hillary clinton. i think the only reason she ever had her job was because of her husband, bill. she did exactly what she has been told to do by the president's, and a lot of us are not on tune with president obama's schedule, especially this benghazi deal. whenever a person throws her hands up in the air and is not want to admit to any responsibility of a job done po
's behavior by members of the military and a savings plan and he finds financial education program substantially increased savings in the tsp have had no or sunpak, for example, on the amount of credit for military members have outstanding. so re-signing of crowd out there. the society by my colleague at harvard looking at denmark are much better data and they are so concerned about privacy. when they look at automatic savings programs, they found little cutout and other parts of the balance sheet either. so i think it's a legitimate concern, though most of the evidence suggests certainly it's not one-for-one offset. >> any other thoughts on the crowd out at all ms. mccarthy? >> i would offer we don't have it. the complexity it would affect the asset the pain is difficult. it's important on the automatic enrollment is a significant impact in getting participants into the plan. our enrollment rate, participation rate is 67% previous automatic enrollment 80%. it's a very powerful distinction in and of itself is so dramatic that it's hard for me to think is creating a big distraction
and strong supporter of catholic education, i once again this year introduced a resolution honoring catholic schools. h.res. 46 expresses support for the vital contributions of the thousands of calt lick elementary and secondary schools -- catholic elementary and secondary schools in the united states and the key role they play in promoting and ensuring a brighter, stronger future for our nation. i'd like to thank the 28 members who co-sponsored this bipartisan resolution with me. since 1974 the national catholic education association, the united states conference of catholic bishops have organized and planned national catholic schools week. this year's theme, catholic schools raise the standards highlights recent initiatives undertaken by catholic schools across the country to strengthen the already exemplary standards. america's catholic schools produce graduates with the schools and integrity needed by our businesses, governments, and communities emphasizing a well-rounded educational experience in instilling the values of giving back to community and helping others. nearly every catholic
, it is the lack of awareness and education that they told us. they never explained to us or even let us know what a concussion was. i had no idea until recently. even since i retired in 2008 from the patriots, i would still experience headaches. i would experience headaches from sunday until tuesday and wednesday. even at times, there's a sense of loneliness, anxiety problems, and sometimes i just get headaches from just being in bright lights. it is tough. people have to understand these players, a lot of their agenda is based on money, but a lot of these players are really suffering read this is for real. i am experiencing now. i am scared to death. i have children and a beautiful wife. i'm scared what will happen to me 10, 15 years from now. >> law concussion were once an unspoken and misunderstood problem, today more than 4000 former nfl players have filed a lawsuit against the league. they contend the nfl, which makes $9.5 billion a year, new hits to the head could lead to long-term brain damage but chose not disclose that information. new rules are being instituted to minimize future injuri
want to point out, which will be live it 10:00 a.m. on c-span3 is education secretary arne duncan talking about waivers for the "no child left behind" bill. on c- like a 10:00 a.m. span3. robert is on our republican line for seamless. should sequestration be allowed to go through? caller: hi. we were calling it the fiscal cliff. all the sudden it seems we have gone away from that and we are calling it sequestration. i thought that the whole term "fiscal cliff" came about because sequestration was part of that. the media keeps differentiating that now. host: you don't see a difference? caller: it is still sequestration, that is the fiscal cliff. that has not gone away. host: semantics aside, what would you like to see done? caller: just for the media to clarify we never really got anywhere except for slight increase in taxes on a small number of people. it was $450 million and above. how many people actually dropped checks of? ? host: $450 million? caller: $450,000. excuse me. i don't know anybody that's actually gets a check of that amount, or maybe a bonus. i don't know. nonethel
successive generation of americans more choices, more options, more education, more opportunities. i think we are faced with the prospect today of the generation of my wife and my two teenage children having the real prospect of having a life not with as many opportunities. in fact, a lower standard of living. that has ever been in the united states. i don't want predict that, i don't project that. i think we're dangerously close to that. and so i cover a lot of different areas in the book. i have 15 chapters, i talk about, as stuart noted, energy, the environment, education, politics. i have two chapters on iraq. i don't think i could write a book about where i think we are in the world today without reflecting to some extempt on iraq because -- to some extented on iraq because it has been the center of gravity in this country for five years. regardless where you come down on iraq, right, left, somewhere in the middle is not the point. i couldn't write a book without talking about iraq. i have a chapter on the middle east, i have a chapter on afghanistan and on china, i talk about russia. in
. it's appropriate i do this at georgetown. as the product of jesuit education, as a catholic and as a beneficiary over the years of your outstanding faculty and staff and your important policy contributions that this university has made in a number of areas that affect people of this country. i'm truly honored to have this opportunity today. i've had a deep and abiding respect for georgetown throughout the almost 40 to 50 years that i've been involved in public service. and i have a deep respect for the generation of leaders that have gone forward from this campus to serve our nation. i just had the opportunity to meet with your cadets. some of the cadets in the rotc program. as someone who went through the rotc program at santa clara university and then ultimately served two years in the army, i can tell you that i have tremendous admiration for those that have made the decision to serve this country in uniform. the talents of these men and women and the innovative programs at georgetown's new institute of women, peace and security underscore for me the university's leadersh
are struggling during this financial crisis. we get calls related to those. we are trying to educate homeowners about that so they did not become victims in the first place. but a lot of people will lose their homes of the situation. host: christy romero, special inspector general for tarp. the question about the teeth -- question of to this executive pay, if treasury signed off on it, what can sigtarp really do? guest: we make recommendations to treasury and a half to be dealt with. we also report to congress. we send these reports to congress and congress helps put teeth in it. but a ultimately we have a lot of recommendations that are not implemented and they need to be. this is an example that shows how bad it can be a treasury does not implement the recommendation. i am looking forward to a new secretary of treasury coming in to talk about those recommendations and changes that can be made. and we will not give up. we will look at 2013 pay. we will not stop. because alternately we are here to protect taxpayers. host: amelia, ohio. democrats' line. caller: how are you? my question is about
educated for the 21st century economy. that means making investments in education. it means trying to address the situation where even as we have for 35 straight months in private sector job creation, we have for much of that time seen job loss in state and local governments. that is a portion of it. in education, schoolteachers, the president has put forward proposals. this is his highest priority. it is important to look at things like immigration reform. businesses have vocally and publicly, as an economic necessity -- the economic benefits of comprehensive immigration reform are manyfold and very important. that is the principal reason the president believes we need to come forward in a bipartisan way and get this done. there is every reason, both economic and otherwise, he to continue to make the progress that has been made, that we have seen. and get it done. get a bill passed that represents the consensus that is building who, he that reflects the principles that are shared by the bipartisan group in the senate, and make it law, make it a fact. >> are there any changes in th
problems and provide assistance. frankly, we also need to educate the force. you have to have peers who are working alongside of you who can identify those problems. someone looks like they have problems, they are having a difficult time, to identify that and make sure that that person gets the help they need. it is like everything else. all of us need to be aware -- all of us need to be a part of the answer to be able to make sure that doesn't happen. but this is something that -- there is no silver bullet. there is no silver bullet here. i wish there was. it means we have to operate on every front to do with this. -- deal with this. we have to be able to make sure that we deployed people in a rational basis so they are deployed into a combat area, but then have an amount of time that they can get their lives back together again. and do it rationally. that has to be done. we have to provide the support system, the health care system, be able to educate the force, to understand and to recognize those kinds of problems. all of that needs to be done if we're to address this. most importan
look at these issues, do you see problems or opportunities? with an advanced degree in education from capella university, you'll have the knowledge to meet these challenges and make a difference in the lives of students. let's get started at capella.edu. in the middle of the night it can be frustrating. it's hard to turn off and go back to sleep. intermezzo is the first and only prescription sleep aid approved for use as needed in the middle of the night when you can't get back to sleep. it's an effective sleep medicine you don't take before bedtime. take it in bed only when you need it and have at least four hours left for sleep. do not take intermezzo if you have had an allergic reaction to drugs containing zolpidem, such as ambien. allergic reactions such as shortness of breath or swelling of your tongue or throat may occur and may be fatal. intermezzo should not be taken if you have taken another sleep medicine at bedtime or in the middle of the night or drank alcohol that day. do not drive or operate machinery until at least 4 hours after taking intermezzo and you're fully awake.
educated. >> but the gi bill is a liberal policy. >> but no, listen to what i'm saying underneath it. i'm talking about the commitment to national defense and understanding of the role of the military and the united states, the relationship between the military national readiness, how we project otherwise in the world. >> but that's the patriotic americans in the united states are african-american? >> sure. but -- >> is there -- >> liberals. those things are -- >> no. but i think when you go underneath, there is a deep well of social conservativism among african-americans. >> i agree 100% with that. but i don't want to see the republican party become a pandering party, either. >> no. that's not what i've said. >> i know that's not what you've said. but our message used to be one of growth, opportunity for everyone. and i think that that still is the message, we just don't get it out in an appropriate way. >> and that's a very good point. >> beyond that, the policy that support that are what's really important and i'd like to see us get back to -- >> can i say quickly, there's been this
was great. she was articulate, well educated, did some wonderful things, knew how to handle the power of male egos, but the press would not give her the same accolade. the general media would not give her the same accolade, not because she was not constant, but because of her political ideology. i think there is some bias in reading hillary clinton -- rating hillary clinton. >> that was lawrence from -- host: that was lawrence from st. paul. "the washington post has this as far as analysis -- nebraska, on the republican line. caller: i would like to make a few comments about hillary clinton. think the only reason that she ever had her job was because of her husband built. she has done exactly what she has been told to do by the president, and a lot of us are not in tune with president obama's schedule. especially when we have at least lousy deals, whenever a person throws her hand up in the air and does not want to admit to any responsibility of the job done poorly that killed some of our american -- not happy with her performance ticket she is just mirror of -- performance. she is j
well-respected and educated scientists who had fled nazi and fascist europe and they were recruited. they were met at the station and driven into town, and they would have checked in at this store, which was supposed to look like just a regular tourist store in santa fe. it was operate bid a woman named dorothy mckin nonwho oppenheimer recite, and she processed their paper work and gave them instructions, and los alamos was guarded with a secure perimeter and they wouldn't be coming back to accept the that often but if they did come they were to use not their own names, make up a name, and not mention their name at all because they all spoke with thick european accent. so they managed to build the bomb and helped end the war earlier. but they definitely had an impact on santa fe. there were rumors about spies, and secrets being traded to the russians, and we know now that was done here in santa fe. another book that is very close to my heart, i want to toll you -- tell you about, it's an older book but it is nonfiction. the house at the bridge written by peggy church. it is a more i
as an economic question and get anything that you want. >> we spend a lot of time talking about education in the foreign policy debate. >> when you were there in the middle of the first debate, the one that the president was said to have them poor, as this was happening, was that your impression? >> no. >> what was your impression? >> the impressions that are going on, i considered more than one thing at a time, and i believed that romney was doing better and i thought that he was doing well. my own rule is that mitt romney is talking, and obama is standing here, i only look at mitt romney and i never look at the other candidate. i don't want to be a party to his reaction. the consequence is that when mitt romney was talking i did not know, even though i was closer to him than anybody, i was not watching the reactions of barack obama. the only time i looked at him as when he was talking. i cannot help but notice a couple of times he did not look at me, i did not have the impression. >> in the vice-presidential debate, did you see or hear anything that we, as television viewers of the deba
'm there to figure out why people commit this crime, to show how it happens and educate people. we approach this like it's a continuing story and continue to cover it. >>> from nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television program, this is "meet the press" with david gregory. substituting today, chuck todd. >>> good morning. it's super bowl sunday. and here in washington, some big showdowns are on the horizon. we've got it all covered this morning, including the big game tonight. bob costas of nbc sports will be here to talk about football and player safety issues. >>> but we want to start with a washington battle on full display this week when the president's pick to head the pentagon, former republican senator chuck hagel, came under fire from members of his own party during a very contentious confirmation hearing. >> name one person in your opinion who's intim nated by the israeli lobby in the united states senate. >> are we right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. >> senator hagel, please answer the question i asked. today, do you think unilateral sanctions would
education calling this unprecedented in any one's memory, the issue here is was there student collab ragds or was there out right cheating. a lawyer i spoke with representatives some of the students said there are two waves, there was cheating and collaboration, because this course reportedly introduction to congress was known as an easy course, where a lot of as were given out, where collaboration was encouraged. then they got a difficult exam. and so they collaborated. some of them too much so. there was even plagiarism according to the university. i had a chance to speak to a student here about this, who knew people that have taken this course before, and has been following this, here's what she told me. >> now in the first week, as to explicitly explain their collaboration policies, so that a teacher will spend ten minutes explaining what is allowed and what is not allowed which didn't used to be the case before. now before every exam every assignment the teachers try to be more explicit what is allowed and what is not. >> reporter: so ashleigh, she's explaining the changes that have h
than oppose it. the board of education in new it is town, connecticut, is requesting funding for armed police officers in four elementary schools for the next school year. in chicago, meanwhile, mayor rahm emanuel is moving 200 officers from desk duty to the streets amid the city's most violent months in decades. 42 people have been murdered this year including 15-year-old who was shot dead this week while hanging out with friends in a park. >> when any young person in our city is gunned down without reason, their death makes an impression on all of us. and it demands action from all of us. the loss of any child in any community in this city is a loss to the entire city. >> she had performed at some of president obama's inauguration events in washington last week. a few years ago she took part in a public service video urging teens to avoid gang violence. >> hi, this commercial is informational for you and your future children. so many children are fearing gangs and it's your job as students to say no to gangs and say yes to a future. joining a gang is not a part of your future. >> let
is knowing your background, knowing your jesuit education and knowing what your values are, i know that you will be very forthcoming with this committee. to speak truth about our and even when it is uncomfortable. that is not an easy way to go. >> truthfulness with a value that was put in me and my parents. it still is to this day. honesty is the best policy. none of us are perfect beings. i would commit to that i would be honest with this committee. it would be my objective to make cia your favorite intelligence agency. [laughter] >> well, i think you are pushing your luck now. thank you. >> senator leven. >> thank you for your willingness to serve here. my question is this, in your opinion does water boarding constitute torture? >> the attorney general has referred to water boarding as torture. many people have referred to it as torture. as you well know and we've had the discussion the term torture has a lot of implications. it is something that should have been banned and it should never have taken place in my view. if i go to c.i.a. it would never be brought back. >> do you have a pers
a real education and in the last two years, i've gotten a chance to work on senate races around the country. i did the east and there were two of us and i did wisconsin east so i have a full half of the country for the 2012 cycle. it was a fascinating two years to be in politics. i would echo what marlon said that campaigns matter. i would love to talk about that even with a gigantic influx of money, the basic fundamental elements of campaigns still very much matter. i actually think there is an inverse relationship to the amount of money that comes in. i think the more television commercials we have, the more media get back its permit people, the more important it becomes to adhere to the basics and remember you have to come to the race with the right candidate for the wright state for the right time and not forget those things in an effort to push somebody in who you think might not win. i love my time at the dscc are started in 2011 and my first day was the week after we had essentially recruited now senator joe donnelly into the race in indiana. he was the first race that i
it is possible to get out there but the challenge is that the education that needs to be given to these people to be effective at countering the hackers is a very in depth technical education. tracy: right. >> and people need to get, to get taught up, basically. tracy: yeah. right. we need staff to teach these people as well. you know, quickly, you said earlier cyberterrorism, really big broad term. i mean, we could be talking about somebody attacking our country and just shutting wall street down or shutting the lights off on everything all together. how do you guard against that? >> well, there's a lot of interdepend den sis between the systems but there is also a lot of safeguards between the systems. i think having a wholesale shutdown of wall street or the entire electric grid is still fairly difficult it achieve, at least for any long periods of time. so a lot of these organizations that are, that face, that are critical infrastructure, that face these sorts of problems, they're already working with the government. they have been identified and they are in these partnerships with governm
educating players is part of the organization responsibility. >> because we are in the bay area. because we are one of the team that is embrace the gay community it's up to me to make sure our guys understand that but i can certainly give them the opportunity to expand their horizons and that's something i will take the responsibility for. >> guy is a young guy and very unfair but when you make comments like that you have to be very, very careful and not offend anyone. >>reporter: chris didn't want to be a distraction and he was asked what he would like to say to the the people of san francisco. >> i'm sorry i offended anyone. very ugly comment and that's not what i feel in in my heart. hopefully i can learn and grow in this experience and i love san francisco. >>reporter: mike sports director larry and wayne and katie are all tweeting behind the scenes action going on at superbowl week for the best superbowl coverage live from new orleans. we are retweeting the highlights at abc 7 news bay area. >> more superbowl coverage a little later on. court appointed monitor revealed today that 2
. you know, that's just good stuff when people are paying taxes. folks are getting educated in america. they are serving in our armed services. they are making our country better and brighter and safer blah, blah, blah, blah, blah blah. why do we need immigration reform? why? it's so important and we will take calls on that too. give us a call on that. taking calls on chuck hagle. twitter is abuzz about chuck. what do you think about this whole immigration stuff? >> it's time to get it done because republicans have finally, gotten on board. i think it's a shame, the time that they deem it's time to get it done. the time to really do it was five years ago. i mean a long time ago. but it's pretty from the parent that republicans realize they have got to get on board because they got their asses handed to them in the last election. the fact that now everybody wants to come to the table and participate, i think it's sad, and i think that it's worth pointing out that that's the reason they want to come to the table. i hope that that doesn't get lost in all
center for the youth michael harris who will discuss how the by a cs played out in education particularly of the unconscious leads to discrimination and re of black and brown males concerning expulsions and the school to prison pipeline that i touched on briefly. before joining he served as the deputy director of the institute in san francisco working to reform the juvenile justice systems. he's worked in california and washington to reduce racial disparities in the juvenile justice system using a collaborative process to affect systemic reform. prior to his stint he was a staff attorney and assistant director of the lawyers committee for civil rights in san francisco and graduated in 83 from the hastings college of law and 1980 graduate of ucla a former fellow at the legal services of south-central tennessee so his extraordinary experience tied to his analysis of these matters is extremely important. let's welcome him to the podium now. [applause] i am just going to pick up where share and left off. i'm going to try to take and apply that so of course you know basically what we are talki
entrepreneurs should cheer you up. if you're worried about the lack of science educators, eager foreign-born people coming here to work there, it is the most obvious and clean solution. paul ryan makes a point of pointing out the growth advantages of immigration.
right. also, there's a lot of talk about gym class or physical education in schools which we've seen cut in a lot of school districts because of budget issues. there's a belief that these classes can actually lead to weight loss. i find that surprising. >> well, i'm concerned about this myth. i think that we have to keep in mind and underscore the -- that gym class in their current form, they're not like in the old days when you got to play. many of our physical education classes now are filled with learning rules, writing about how you feel about this sport, you know, we need to ingrain habits in kids early. and even though our research doesn't show that the current form of physical education classes is associated with weight loss, it's not sensitive enough to see the changes in body composition. more importantly, erica, it builds confidence in kids to actually have lifelong habits of physical activity. so we have to keep in mind what our end goal here is. >> that's what's important, to instill that goal in kids. just to get moving every day so they carry it through their adult life. >>
, and it will help refine and educate the house members about what this bill is all about in ways where it may be just as going to talk to them could not, and so i think that those things are important. a good number of republicans go through the regular way. >> asking a question, which i think is a safe topic for overtime questions, but first, what did i miss? is there something that should be button down here that i did not ask? >> moderate read state democrats -- red state democrats from montana, those that voted against the plan in 2007 -- >> i am not going to speak for any individual senator. look. we are going to get the overwhelming majority of senators, but we do not expect to get them all, so we will need a number of republicans to vote for the bill to get 60. >> all of the young people have a copy of the politico, which is required reading. there will be a written quiz on today's edition. [laughter] >> senator mccain, you mentioned senator kennedy in your remarks, and it was talked about senator schumer becoming the deal maker. he had influence with his democratic colleagues and the
educated, so the democrats love to nominate people with ivy league pedigree is to speak in complete paragraphs. stevenson, kennedy, roosevelt, even bill clinton, barack obama. the republicans are seen as the party of the landed gentry and the well off, and like to nominate candidates from humble origins, whether it is richard nixon, ronald reagan, certainly herbert hoover, dwight eisenhower, jerry ford, and that is why george h w bush, another man who i like and admire enormously at the personal level -- an incredibly thoughtful man -- he reinforced the perception of the republicans as the party of the landed gentry. it became a problem in 1992. >> which campaign did you dislike the most? >> the 2012 campaign was a pretty bad campaign. >> because? >> i do not think either barack obama or mitt romney really likes politics that much. you have to have people who like politics. >> how can you not like politics and run for president? >> you will have to ask them or their doctors. i do not think either one of them get much joy out of it. >> do you still get joy out of it? >> i do. not as
-immigration wing. but you made an important point. we need legal immigration across skill and education levels so we don't create and underground for workers. i'm glad that people like you and mayor castro are there talking about some of the important issues. >> well, you know what? here's what i say. i'm happy -- let me share it this way. i know i can. i'm in the gym go down to shower up and shave and do a little exercise. i'm coming up. i see paul ryan. paul ryan knows i did everything i could to make sure he wasn't vice president of the united states. and he comes up and he says hey luis, you and i worked together in 2005. he endorsed the kennedy mccain -- he was part of our combo. he endorsed it. he was a sponsor of the bill. he said you know, luis, i want to do it because it is the right thing to do. i went back to his office. we talked. he said you know, luis, you and i fundamentally are catholics right. it is not in our value system to create a permanent funded class. he wants to fix it because it is the right thing to do. so you know what? i have to tell you something i think there are a
or their nuclear weapons plan in it, and they're unfortunately not so much about educating anybody on serious issues that we face. so from that perspective senator hagel's demeanor was entirely understandable, and i can't even begin to imagine how incredibly it mustfrustrating it must have been for him. heather hurlburt and david schuster. be will he be confirmed? >> he'll be confirmed. >> john: welcome back to "viewpoint." and its time for the thing of the day. tonight's thing is the unrequited love of the day. in the interest of dr. phil part of which aired today. a man admitted that he loved manti teo. if you're looking for someone to love you back, maybe don't pretend to be a girl for two years. it might lead to unpleasantness. >>> and speaking of un unpleasanten. the war is breaking out own immigration war between tea party extremists and republicans who like getting re-elected because they're in states with growing latino populations. quote. any action in the senate to approve such a reform effort is likely to kick off an interparty war in the house. that will make the battles in the g.
of courage after she was attacked for her crusade to educate pakistani girls. doctors say they are pleased with the progress malala is making and we will hear from her in a minute. first we will bring in our chief medical correspondent. sanjay, good to see you. you are of course a neurosurgeon, you have done these types of surgeries before. sometimes in the battlefield, as i recall. explain for us what was involved in replacing this piece of missing bone in her skull. the most extraordinary thing is you have this girl shot in the head, she was so eloquent and speaking so well. tell us how you did this. >> reporter: it's extraordinary on many levels. there are all types of injuries. and certainly neurosurgeons want to know exactly what happened to the brain. what exactly the type of injury was. that makes a difference in terms of all of the types of operations. take a look, you have to look from the front, you also have to look from the side, to really get an idea of what the bullet, when she was shot at point blank range, what it did. it was the left side of her head. but look over there,
desegregation. we have the historic decision in 1954, brown birth -- versus board of education. then the supreme court comes back in 1955 and refuses to put a timetable on it. so, activists, like rosa parks, -- there is a workshop in tennessee for people that want to implement school desegregation because the court will not press it forward. she attend this workshop. it is a very important and transformative time for her. she described it as the first time she could discuss things with my people and not feel hostility. there were 40 people attending the workshop. everyone was committed to school desegregation. her own spirit lives. she talks about love and miles horton's sense of humor. getting to eat and be in a interracial space, people eating together, they shared rooms, they sat outside together. that freedom was also transformative, personally. she comes back, and in some ways, the atmosphere of segregation in montgomery becomes harder to bear, i think. the evening of dec. 1st, 1955, she had gotten off work. she decides to wait for a less crowded bus, she grows to the drug store and buys a
. >> steve: she's an education reformer known for her no nonsense approach during her time as the chancellor of dc schools and she's not done fighting at this point. michelle rhee is now the head of grassroots group called students first. she also has a brand-new book out called "radical." she joins us in the studio. you radical, you. you wrote this book where you put students first. for the average mom out there watching, she's got some kids in school and she's frustrated because she knows the system is broken. >> that's right. there are so many parents out there who are living life every day and they don't know what to do because they're frustrated with their school system and their kids' school experience. so i wanted to write "radical" to help the parents understand why the system is the way it is what it is and what they should do. >> steve: you were telling me in the break just about, for instance, in los angeles, this seems like a no brainer, some sexual predator was a teacher and yet, what happened? >> so they found all this evidence that this guy was a sexual predator. they couldn't
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